False Binary, False Victories: Drafting and Revising as Partner Process

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Monday, July 21st, 2014 | 62 views

Writing about writing process is hard to do without making some broad generalizations riddled with exceptions, so let’s get the first out of the way now: there are two types of writers, those who love to draft, and those who love to revise.

It’s clear which camp has claimed me. I’m messy by nature, born with a high tolerance for stacks of teetering books on the floor, scraps of fabric and sequins piled in the corner, overstuffed bulletin boards with layers upon layers of postcards, photographs, ticket stubs. Not quite a hoarder, but hoard-ish—and the same goes for my drafts.

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Amy Sohn Talks The Actress with Choire Sicha

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Wednesday, July 16th, 2014 | 292 views

Amy Sohn reads from her latest novel, The Actress, at WORD Bookstore in Greenpoint Brooklyn

WORD Bookstore hosted Amy Sohn to talk about her latest novel, The Actress, (July 2014), with Choire Sicha, co-proprietor of The Awl. Sohn provided pierogies from a neighborhood restaurant and Sicha set the mood as casual, insisting members of the audience should call out questions or comments they pair could answer or refute.

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Conjunctions #62 Launch at the NYU Bookstore

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Monday, July 14th, 2014 | 150 views

Conjunctions editor Bradford Morrow

New York might get a bad rap for sky-high rents, but at least it isn’t Antwerp. Antwerp in the 1860’s, that is. A vitriolic diatribe written by Charles Baudelaire against the defenseless little country of Belgium appears in the latest issue of the Pushcart Prize-hoarding magazine Conjunctions. According to Baudelaire, the 19th century poet and essayist, low rents were the only things the “ragamuffin” of a state had going for it in the mid-1800’s.

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Emily Gould Talks Friendship With Elif Batuman

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Friday, July 11th, 2014 | 241 views

Emily Gould reads from her new novel, Friendship at McNally Jackson Books in Manhattan

If there is a literary equivalent of a shock-jock radio D.J., it might be Emily Gould, the essayist, memoirist, and blogger known for honest confessionalism, sometimes criticized as bordering on narcissism. Her 2010 collection of personal essays And the Heart Says Whatever earned her a $200,000 advance, and then the book flopped, as she describes in the essay “How Much my Novel Cost Me.” Gould now returns with a new book, the novel Friendship, but the distinction between fictional and nonfictional narrative remains insignificant. Gould pulls inspiration from her own life and that of her close friends creating a story of the friendship of two young women as they bumble through their twenties in New York City. Comparisons have been drawn to Lena Dunham’s Girls, though perhaps without the glitz and glitter of an HBO set. While Dunham’s girls’ blunders transpire across the Disneyland like paradise of Williamsburg and Greenpoint, a romanticized version of an already saccharine sweet world, Gould’s young women, Amy and Bev, find themselves in the distinctly less glamorous if equally expensive brownstone neighborhoods of Brooklyn.

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Celeste Ng Discusses Everything I Never Told You with Catherine Chung

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Thursday, July 10th, 2014 | 273 views

Celeste Ng reads from her new novel, Everything I never Told You, at Greenlight Bookstore in Brooklyn

The Asian American Writers Workshop hosted Celeste Ng at Greenlight Bookstore to discuss her debut novel, Everything I Never Told You. She was joined by Catherine Chung, author of Forgotten Country (2012).

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Scott Cheshire Reads High As The Horses’ Bridle with Philipp Meyer

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Wednesday, July 9th, 2014 | 165 views

Scott Cheshire reads from High as the Horses Bridle at Powerhouse Arena in DUMBO

Scott Cheshire launched his debut novel High As The Horses Bridle at Powerhouse Arena in Brooklyn. Cheshire serves as the interviews editor at Tottenville Review. He was joined in conversation by novelist Philipp Meyer, author of American Rust (2009) and The Son (2013).

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The Internet: Not Just for Porn

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Tuesday, July 1st, 2014 | 337 views

Melissa Adamo attempts to navigate the internet

My relationship with technology could be a romantic comedy—with blogs starring as that guy right under my nose, the guy who’s so perfect for me in his imperfection, so stellar with his boyish charm and manly good looks. Like any good romcom, let’s start with images of my past as the opening credits roll, so you can understand all future plot points:

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Kate Zambreno Relaunches Green Girl With Elissa Schappell

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Wednesday, June 25th, 2014 | 256 views

Kate Zambreno and Elissa Schappell discuss Green Girl at Powerhouse Arena in DUMBO Brooklyn

Kate Zambreno first published Green Girl three years ago through the small Emergency Press. She had the rare opportunity to revise the novel and relaunch the book to a wider audience through HarperCollins. The new edition is longer and includes an extra post-novel section as well as an original essay. She launched the new edition at Powerhouse Arena with Tin House co-founder and editor-at-large Elissa Schappell.

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