A Tale of Teaching and Writing (in Parentheticals)

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Monday, April 14th, 2014 | 2,240 views

Remember what you’re here for, my professors repeated during my two years enrolled in the Rutgers-Newark MFA program. Do not permit teaching responsibilities to interfere with writing, they would say. Their words echoed in my adjunct office, bouncing back and forth between concrete walls (there were no windows; it looked like a glorious prison cell). I felt as if I was hiding a shameful secret when I nodded along to their sage words. But here it is in print now: I felt as passionately about teaching as I did about writing, and on many occasions (please don’t tell them), I did let teaching trump writing; I was still learning the program’s requirements and the students’ abilities (or lack thereof) as well as my own (or lack thereof works here, too). I felt I was there for both (like the true rebel that I am).

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Muliebrous Omnibus: Renaming Chick Lit

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Sunday, October 6th, 2013 | 2,523 views

A little less than twenty years ago, the “chick lit” genre was launched, arguably, with Helen Fielding’s 1996 Bridget Jones’s Diary. Next week, Fielding releases the third book in the Bridge Jones franchise, Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy. Looking back, its easy to claim that Bridget Jones was a phenomenon: the book spawned a […]

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Books, Authors and Tote Bags at the Brooklyn Book Festival

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Sunday, September 22nd, 2013 | 2,164 views

The Brooklyn Book Festival filled downtown Brooklyn with the largest free literary event in New York City. In addition to the half dozen venues featuring readings, panels and author signings, Borough Hall Plaza was filled with vendors, presses, publishers, literary journals, and authors. The Main Stage of the book festival relied on the steps of […]

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Poets unfit for Flavorwire

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Thursday, August 8th, 2013 | 14,983 views

A response and counter-list to their post “23 people who will make you care about poetry in 2013” Inspired by Patricia Lockwood’s poem “Rape Joke,” Jason Diamond produced for Flavorwire the list “23 People who will make you care about poetry in 2013,” a list of poets that he believes dispels the notion that “poetry […]

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Jami Attenberg Reads The Middlesteins

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Thursday, October 25th, 2012 | 2,367 views

The internet had generated so much buzz over Jami Attenberg’s newest novel, The Middlesteins, that when I suggested to a friend we should meet up there to hear her read, he scoffed that the place would be overrun and too crowded. But I still wanted to go, not just because of the internet chatter but […]

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On Reading Junot Diaz’s This is How You Lose Her

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Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012 | 1,697 views

I began reading Diaz’s new book only to think, “haven’t I read this already.” And then it occurred to me, that really, I’ve read this book twice already. His short story collection, Drown, is more or less a rough draft for the narrative of his critically acclaimed, award winning The Brief and Wondrous Life of […]

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On Reading The Perks of Being A Wallflower

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Sunday, September 23rd, 2012 | 1,503 views

I accidentally read The Perks of Being a Wallflower a week before the theatrical release last Friday. A friend had recommended it, somewhat out of thin air, and not wanting to disappoint, dutifully read it within a week. I knew quickly why he connected to the text as the young characters explore their homosexuality and […]

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Chabon Gets a Handy from New York Mag

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Tuesday, September 18th, 2012 | 1,490 views

Michael Chabon’s latest book, Telegraph Avenue, is sitting in the queue on my desk alongside a half dozen other books. Its release date unfortunately coincided with the release of Junot Diaz’s newest book, and for no particularly reason (though Chabon’s novel was longer), I began reading This Is How You Lose Her first. In a […]

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