Reading Series Census:
Say Yes

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Friday, September 4th, 2015 | 4,540 views

The New York City Reading Series Census is an ongoing project to catalogue the contemporary literary scene. Any reading series curator in the New York area can take the survey here.

What is the name of the series, and what is the significance or meaning of the series name?
Say Yes

The name is a call to positivity and cooperation, as our collective aims to truly build a community in addition to providing space for performance. When we say yes to each other, it’s pretty amazing to see what can happen.

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Reading Series Census: Atlas Reading Series

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Thursday, September 3rd, 2015 | 4,541 views

The New York City Reading Series census is an ongoing project to catalogue the contemporary literary scene. Any reading series curator in the New York area can take the survey here.

What is the name of the series, and what is the significance or meaning of the series name?
I feel it’s always been a bit of an identity crisis, our name. We, the reading series, are also we, the literary journal, The Atlas Review. At times I have called what the reading series is simply The Atlas Reading Series. Other times, I call it—even more simply—Atlas. When I ask people to read for the series, I explain that we are a journal that publishes work in all genre biannually and, to supplement our volumes, we have a monthly reading series. The series of Atlas helps to keep the journal of Atlas on the map, as it were. Are maps involved in the reading series? Nope. But if you want to involve a map, we’ve got a whole multimedia option for your set.

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Benjamin Moser and Porochista Khakpour discuss Clarice Lispector

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Tuesday, September 1st, 2015 | 4,992 views

Porochista Khakpour and Benjamin Moser discuss Clarice Lispector at WORD Brooklyn at an event sponsored by Vol 1 Brooklyn

Benjamin Moser has spent the last twelve years of his life immersed in the Brazilian author Clarice Lispector. He has written a biography of her, translated and edited her works, and most recently contributed to the The Complete Stories, translated by Katrina Dodson. He was at WORD Bookstore in Brooklyn to discuss Lispector’s life and work along with the novelist Porochista Khakpour, at an event hosted by Vol 1 Brooklyn.

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Alexandra Kleeman Discusses You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine with Isaac Fitzgerald

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Monday, August 31st, 2015 | 4,067 views

Alexandra Kleeman reading from her debut novel YOU TOO CAN HAVE A BODY LIKE MINE at PowerHouse Arena

Alexandra Kleeman’s debut novel You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine has attracted widespread positive attention. The launch of the novel at PowerHouse Arena was a virtual who’s who of young literary Brooklyn with the audience including many of the summer’s other popular literary debut novelists. Kleeman was joined in conversation by Buzzfeed Books editor Isaac Fitzgerald.

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Jennifer Pashley Discusses The Scamp with Julia Fierro

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Tuesday, August 25th, 2015 | 2,306 views

Jennifer Pashley reads THE SCAMP at WORD Brooklyn

Jennifer Pashley was at WORD Bookstore in Brooklyn to discuss her novel, The Scamp. The book explores small town, post-industrial America through the eyes of two women. Rayelle is trying to escape her life, and signs on to help investigate the disappearance of women in the area. Khaki has a darker, more troubling past–she’s responsible for the disappearing women. Pashley discussed the novel with Julia Fierro, founder of the Sackett Street Writers Workshop and author of Cutting Teeth.

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The Bastard Who Last Cut My Hair

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Monday, August 24th, 2015 | 2,181 views

It’s always been six or eight weeks since my last cut, and I always want the same thing, which is to get my hair back to the way it was when I last had it cut by DeWayne. DeWayne mans the chair next to the bastard in this three-chair barbershop in Oak Grove, Oregon, an unincorporated suburb of Portland that doesn’t boast a multitude of options, so I have to take what I can get. Of course, my solution should be to get my hair cut by DeWayne every time, but this is one of those antiquated places that doesn’t take appointments, which means my options are to come through the front door, declare “I’ll wait for DeWayne,” have a seat, and wait for DeWayne to finish his last charge. Or I can just get my hair cut by the always-available John.

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Helen Phillips Discusses The Beautiful Bureaucrat with Jenny Offill

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Wednesday, August 19th, 2015 | 2,272 views

Helen Phillips and Jenny Offill discuss THE BEAUITFUL BUREAUCRAT at McNally Jackson Books in Manhattan

Helen Phillips was at McNally Jackson books discussing her debut adult novel The Beautiful Bureaucrat with Jenny Offill, author of Dept. of Speculation. Phillips previously published the short story collection And Yet They Were Happy, as well as a children’s adventure book Where the Sunbeams are Green.

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These Two Lanes Will Take Us Anywhere: Alice Munro and Bruce Springsteen

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Monday, August 17th, 2015 | 1,962 views

Having just published my first book, I am often asked about my influences. I have a great list to rattle off: Lorrie Moore, Jo Ann Beard, Laurie Colwin, Justin Torres, Amy Hempel, Junot Diaz. I could go on. But, if I had only two pedestals to erect, I know who they’d be for: Alice Munro and Bruce Springsteen.

Although I am from New Jersey, my love of the Ontario writer Alice Munro long predates my discovery of Freehold’s own Bruce Springsteen. Given my feelings toward my home state during the period I was first learning about music—like many people, my middle and high school years—it follows that I would have dismissed Springsteen as resoundingly not for me. Munro, on the other hand, I came to early. She was the first author I ever learned about who eschewed novels, publishing only story collections. Some consider Lives of Girls and Women or The Beggar Maid to be novels, but in those books, each story works separately, while still coming together to comprise a whole. Munro’s protagonists are primarily, if not always, girls or women. They are not always, or even often, beautiful. She not only allows tragedy to befall her characters, but she allows them to commit horrible acts. In other words, she lets them be real. I aspire to her bravery in this regard; I still find it hard to reveal the ugliness in my characters. Even more aspirational than her plot or her characters, though, are her sentences.

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