Tara Conklin Reads Her Debut Novel The House Girl

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Thursday, November 14th, 2013 | 1,806 views

Tara Conklin reads from her novel, The House Girl, At WORD Bookstore in Brooklyn

Tara Conklin’s The House Girl follows two divided narratives — part historical fiction set in 1852 Virginia and part contemporary novel set 2004 New York. The narrative switches between an escaped slave and a young associate lawyer. She read at WORD Bookstore with Charles Dubow.

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Editors Cat Richardson, Emily Brandt, Alex Cuff, and Natalie Eilbert Discuss the Future of the Periodical

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Tuesday, November 12th, 2013 | 2,771 views

Harpers headquarters painting in the New York Public Library

The future of the periodical seems very much secure within the monumental walls of the New York Public Library, a grand space with carved wood trim and oil paintings of iconic publishing houses like Hearst, McGraw Hill and Harper’s. But the evening is not about the past or the monuments to publishers of the past. Instead, the night is about the future. The editors of three journals at the vanguard of the New York City literary scene are joined by their contributors to discuss the origins and future of the magazines.

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Impressions of Berl’s Brooklyn Poetry Shop + Eric Amling and Nate Klug

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Monday, November 11th, 2013 | 3,217 views

Berl's Poetry shop, Photo by Erik Kennedy

Berl’s Brooklyn Poetry Shop, one of the only all-poetry book shops in the nation—nay, the world!—had its triumphant grand opening a weekend ago. The day was full of cheer, liquid cheer, fellowship, books and chapbooks, and some two dozen readings. Everyone went home happy and fulfilled.

But I missed that. This is not about that.

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Jonathan Miles Reads Want Not

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Wednesday, November 6th, 2013 | 2,549 views

Jonathan Miles, Author of Want Not and Dear American Airlines launches his latest book at Greenlight Bookstore in Brooklyn

Jonathan Miles launched his second novel, Want Not, at Greenlight Bookstore last night with a reading and questions from the audience. He is also a journalist and his first novel, Dear American Airlines (2008), garnered praise.

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Eleanor Catton reads The Luminaries

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Tuesday, November 5th, 2013 | 2,214 views

Man Booker prize winner Eleanor Catton reads from her novel The Luminaries at Community Bookstore in Park Slope Brooklyn

Eleanor Catton, author of the The Luminaries and recipient of the 2013 Man Booker Prize winner read from her novel at Community Bookstore. The novel, set in in 1866 New Zealand during the second gold rush, follows a tight structure linked to the signs of the Zodiac. The story unfolds during twelve days throughout a year, each corresponding with the zodiac periods, while twelve characters, also linked to astrological symbols, find themselves caught in a murder mystery.

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Will Self Reads Umbrella, with Martin Amis

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Wednesday, October 30th, 2013 | 3,642 views

Martin Amis and Will Self read at McNally Jackson books

Two giants of modern British literature came together to discuss their differences and read from their recent novels. Will Self, who is also a literal giant, read from his latest novel, Umbrella and Martin Amis read from Lionel Asbo.

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Gabriel Roth reads from The Unknowns with Kristopher Jansma, author of The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards

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Tuesday, October 29th, 2013 | 2,320 views

Gabriel Roth reads at the Center for Fiction from his novel The Unknowns

The Center for Fiction brought Gabriel Roth and Kristopher Jansma together for a discussion of coming of age stories. Both Jansma’s The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards and Roth’s The Unknowns feature protagonists in their twenties coming to terms with adulthood. Roth qualifies this point by saying of his protagonist that “he completely fails to come of age,” and in a way, his novel is about the failure to mature.

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Reflections on the Silent, Insidious Writer Shortage of the 21st Century

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Monday, October 28th, 2013 | 2,111 views

Everywhere one travels in literary circles—book launches, cocktail parties, the adjunct lounges at third-tier academic institutions—one hears the same lament: We have too many writers. Whether the cause is the invention of the word processor and the availability of self-publishing on demand, or the explosion of new MFA programs, or merely a culture steeped in […]

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